Archive for September, 2013

An Essay on Hypocrisy, by Tim McVeigh

Monday, September 30th, 2013

Note: Outpost of Freedom first published this “Essay” in 1997. It is being republished in the blog so as to allow discussion, as the original posting at “An Essay on Hypocrisy“, where it will remain, though that page now has a link to this blog page to facilitate discussion. opf

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As you read the essay, understand why I have always felt that McVeigh lit the fuse, but is not guilty of a crime. At this past weekend’s Jubilation 98, I met James Nichols and Bob Papovich {Freedom’s End}.  While speaking with Bob, and he, having glanced at my writings on the subject Oklahoma City Bombing, wondered why I could say that McVeigh lit the fuse, but was NOT GUILTY. Quite simply, the answer lies in each of our respective states of mind with regard to our relationship with the US government. McVeigh had determined that he was at war with the US government. I can empathizes with his feelings, for I judge my circumstance to be the same. It is only those who have not come to the point of that recognition that have difficulty in understanding this perspective. — opf

An Essay on Hypocrisy

By Timothy McVeigh

 

Editor’s (Media Bypass magazine) note: Timothy McVeigh, sentenced to death for his role in the April 19, 1995 bombing in Oklahoma City, penned the following essay, dated “March 1998,” from his cell in the administrative maximum section of the federal prison in Florence, Colo. In a preface, McVeigh wrote “I have chosen Media Bypass as a possible forum for this piece because, frankly, I realize that it is quite provocative — and I rather doubt that any mainstream media would touch it. [Note that although the enclosed is very provocative, it was written to provoke thought — and was not written with malevolent intent.]”

McVeigh apologized for the essay being handwritten, but noted his “current (unique) environment does not provide access to a typewriter, a word processor or a copier. (hell, I’m lucky they let me have a pen!), so I hope you understand why this is being submitted handwritten — and I hope you can overcome this shortcoming.”

McVeigh, whose interview with Media Bypass [February 1996] was picked up and dissected by the New York Times and major media outlets across the nation, also expressed concerns that reporting subsequent to this essay might be “printed out of context… but at least the original can be accurate.”

A decorated U.S. Army veteran of the Persian Gulf War, McVeigh hereby offers his contribution to the debate over U.S. policy toward Iraq, a policy that McVeigh says is marked by a “deep hypocrisy.”

 

The administration has said that Iraq has no right to stockpile chemical or biological weapons (“weapons of mass destruction”) — mainly because they have used them in the past.

Well, if that’s the standard by which these matters are decided, then the U.S. is the nation that set the precedent. The U.S. has stockpiled these same weapons (and more) for over 40 years. The U.S. claims that this was done for deterrent purposes during the “Cold War” with the Soviet Union. Why, then is it invalid for Iraq to claim the same reason (deterrence) — with respect to Iraq’s (real) war with, and the continued threat of, its neighbor Iran?

The administration claims that Iraq has used these weapons in the past. We’ve all seen the pictures that show a Kurdish woman and child frozen in death from the use of chemical weapons. But, have you ever seen these pictures juxtaposed next to pictures from Hiroshima or Nagasaki?

I suggest that one study the histories of World War I, World War II and other “regional conflicts” that the U.S. has been involved in to familiarize themselves with the use of “weapons of mass destruction.”

Remember Dresden? How about Hanoi? Tripoli? Baghdad? What about the big ones– Hiroshima and Nagasaki? (At these two locations, the U.S. killed at least 150,000 non-combatants — mostly women and children — in the blink of an eye. Thousands more took hours, days, weeks, or months to die.)

If Saddam is such a demon, and people are calling for war crimes charges and trials against him and his nation, why do we not hear the same cry for blood directed at those responsible for even greater amounts of “mass destruction” — like those responsible and involved in dropping bombs on the cities mentioned above?

The truth is, the U.S. has set the standard when it comes to the stockpiling and use of weapons of mass destruction.

Hypocrisy when it comes to death of children? In Oklahoma City, it was family convenience that explained the presence of a day-care center placed between street level and the law enforcement agencies which occupied the upper floors of the building. Yet when discussion shifts to Iraq, any day-care center in a government building instantly becomes “a shield.” Think about that.

(Actually, there is a difference here. The administration has admitted to knowledge of the presence of children in or near Iraqi government buildings, yet they still proceed with their plans to bomb — saying that they cannot be held responsible if children die. There is no such proof, however, that knowledge of the presence of children existed in relation to the Oklahoma City bombing.)

When considering morality and mens rea [criminal intent] in light of these facts, I ask: Who are the true barbarians?

Yet another example of this nation’s blatant hypocrisy is revealed by the polls which suggest that this nation is greatly in favor of bombing Iraq.

In this instance, the people of the nation approve of bombing government employees because they are “guilty by association” — they are Iraqi government employees. In regard to the bombing in Oklahoma City, however, such logic is condemned.

What motivates these seemingly contradictory positions? Do people think that government workers in Iraq are any less human than those in Oklahoma City? Do they think that Iraqis don’t have families who will grieve and mourn the loss of their loved ones? In this context, do people come to believe that the killing of foreigners is somehow different than the killing of Americans?

I recently read of an arrest in New York City where possession of a mere pipe bomb was charged as possession of a “weapon of mass destruction.” If a two pound pipe bomb is a “weapon of mass destruction,” then what do people think that a 2,000-pound steel-encased bomb is?

I find it ironic, to say the least, that one of the aircraft that could be used to drop such a bomb on Iraq is dubbed “The Spirit of Oklahoma.”

When a U.S. plane or cruise missile is used to bring destruction to a foreign people, this nation rewards the bombers with applause and praise. What a convenient way to absolve these killers of any responsibility for the destruction they leave in their wake.

Unfortunately, the morality of killing is not so superficial. The truth is, the use of a truck, a plane, or a missile for the delivery of a weapon of mass destruction does not alter the nature of the act itself.

These are weapons of mass destruction — and the method of delivery matters little to those on the receiving end of such weapons.

Whether you wish to admit it or not, when you approve, morally, of the bombing of foreign targets by the U.S. military, you are approving of acts morally equivilent to the bombing in Oklahoma City. The only difference is that this nation is not going to see any foreign casualties appear on the cover of Newsweek magazine.

It seems ironic and hypocritical that an act viciously condemned in Oklahoma City is now a “justified” response to a problem in a foreign land. Then again, the history of United States policy over the last century, when examined fully, tends to exemplify hypocrisy.

When considering the use of weapons of mass destruction against Iraq as a means to an end, it would be wise to reflect on the words of the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis. His words are as true in the context of Olmstead as they are when they stand alone: “Our government is the potent, the omnipresent teacher. For good or for ill, it teaches the whole people by its example.”

Sincerely

Timothy J. McVeigh

 

For the next post in this series What did Timothy McVeigh really say?

He Who Leads the Charge

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013

He Who Leads the Charge

Gary Hunt
Outpost of Freedom
September 11, 2013

 

Some will fall so that others can live — to carry their banner to victory!

In war, those who survive have no cause for self-pity.  It is those who did not survive that the honor and the glory go to.  It is their sacrifice that allowed the survivors to continue on to victory.  It is because of those who gave their lives that the battle, and, the war, were won.

Who, then, is the first to breach the ramparts of the enemy; to take the attack where it must go, if victory is the goal?  He is the one whom history will honor for what he has given; who will be honored by those who followed him into battle.

I don’t fear death.  I do, however, fear dying, for death is a known, and we all know that it will take us in its grasp.  Samuel Clemons (Mark Twain) describes death as “the well earned rest”.  Regardless of how each of us perceive what follows it, the dying is the unknown, and we have that fear of the unknown that causes reluctance to proceed.  We have no way of knowing, until those final moments, what course the dying will take.  Will it be instantaneous?  Perhaps drawn out and painful?  By whatever means, can it be less painful than a slow demise, home, in bed, without purpose?  Especially, when our time in history has such a purpose, which needs to be fulfilled more than at almost any other time in our history?

As assuredly as death will take us all, the dying is nothing more than the doorway to the former.  If we don’t fear the former, then, perhaps, it is better to discount the latter, as it will be as inevitable as the former, though it is how the latter is achieved that determines just how history will look upon us.

In peace, material prosperity, self-indulgence, and the preservation of existence, are the general aim.  In war, the individual is only one of many, and each expendable, and self-sacrifice is accepted as the norm.  It is the evolution between the two states of mind that must be accomplished before effectual change can occur.

Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?

Sunday, September 1st, 2013

Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?

Gary Hunt
Outpost of Freedom
September 2, 2013

There comes a time when we are past the point of words; only action will achieve the goal that we have set.  That goal is founded upon our belief in, and our determination to support, the Constitution — and, the peaceful transition of the office of President.  Now, we must consider what to do when that transfer appears to be the harbinger of the total destruction of the way of life to which we are accustomed.

Every four years, the people of this country elect a new Executive to wield the reins of government.  To date, the United States of America is the only country in the world in which the government was truly created by the authority of the people.  In so doing, they required that the Executive take the following oath: “I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.

All subordinate offices, which require an oath, are similar to the following: “I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter: So help me God.

Interestingly, with the exception of the Executive, the oath includes, “I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic.”  The stipulation “all enemies, foreign and domestic“, though omitted in the former, is included in all of the latter.

In a previous article (Sons of Liberty #14); the concept of self-government was discussed.  Part of that discussion dwelt upon the means by which governments are dissolved (dissolution).  First, they can be dissolved by force, by a conquering army, wherein they are absorbed within the government of the conqueror.

Second, they can be dissolved when an external force, not by outright conquest, instills a modified form of the existing government, albeit friendly to the external force, whereby through a slow transitional process, the existing government is modified to a new form.  (This, we impose upon countries under the guise of bringing them democracy.)

Thirdly, when an existing representative form of government is subverted by internal forces, such as: When the executive arbitrarily imposes his will on the elected representatives and the people; when the trust bestowed upon the legislative body is betrayed, by whatever means, whereby the ultimate authority is transferred from the people to arbitrary authority by the Legislative or the Executive, contrary to the document that brought the legislative body into existence; and, lastly, when the people become subject to the influence of a foreign power, thereby influencing the legislative body to pass laws inconsistent with the original foundation of the government.  It is of this last method of dissolution that we must concern ourselves.

Of these three forms of dissolution of government, we must concern ourselves with the third and its three basic elements.

Of the first, the Executive, we have seen in our history, a number of usurpations that don’t seem to be supported by the Constitution.  John Adams elicited legislative support for his Alien and Sedition Acts.  These Acts were to discourage dissent and criticism of the executive.  Of them, the Supreme Court overturned some; the remainder expired at the end of Adams’ term of office.  Later, Andrew Jackson refused to enforce laws enacted by the legislature.  During the Civil War, both Lincoln and the Congress enacted laws contrary to the Constitution.  All of these, however, pale when compared to recent usurpation of authority by the executive branch of government, resulting in their near dictatorial power, without regard to the Constitution, to which the executive oath was taken.

Of the next, the legislative, as discussed above, has been willing, under generally extraordinary circumstances, to enact laws contrary to the Constitution, has, recently, especially with the support of the judiciary, imposed upon the people of this country laws that are totally outside of any authority or power granted by the Constitution.  Beyond that, the judiciary has become legislative, and has broadened the interpretation of laws enacted by the legislature, and, by undermining the authority of the state governments to enact laws under their respective constitutions, provided us with, rather than interpretations of the Constitution, expansion of the authority of the federal government.

The consequences of the two above-mentioned usurpations has resulted in an electorate comprised of foreign interests, often illegally within this country, and often voting for those who promise them benefits and privileges that are greater than even those allowed to the people of this country.

The effect of the mis-administration of government according to the Constitution has resulted in a dissolution of government by the third method, which has been so subtle as to have been almost overlooked as it incrementally dissolved our freedoms.

Let’s look at some aspects of government, wherein we have seen the results of incrementalism and destruction of the foundations of our government.

Education:  In 1867, an “Office of Education” was established within the federal government.  Its purpose was to provide information and arrange for land grants to establish state colleges for agricultural and mechanical purposes.  Curriculum and all administrative matters were determined at the local level.  In 1953, a position was created and known as “Health, Education, and Welfare”.  At that time, curriculum and all administrative matters were determined at the local level, though in some cases subject to state intrusion.  Today, we have a dictatorial federal agency that mandates curriculum, testing, and social engineering, without regard to any more than token input from interested parties, leaving all decisions in the hands of a few select administrators.  Do we need to continue to pile incident upon incident to create a case?  Or has the time come for action?

Religion:  We have transformed the constitutional prohibition of government enacting any “law respecting an establishment of religion”, to an unconstitutional, and undesirable, “separation of church and state”, to the point that United States Supreme Court, with numerous engravings of the 10 Commandments or Moses on the edifices of that institution has summarily dictated that any representation of Christian belief cannot be demonstrated in, and in some cases even spoken of, in buildings owned by the public.  Meanwhile, atheism, through the same Court, has caused the forced removal of Christian symbols that have stood for decades, or longer, asserting that they are unconstitutional.  The tenets of Islam (Shariah Law) have, however, found standing in the lesser courts to justify actions that have been held as unlawful for centuries.  Likewise, they have allowed promotion of Islam in the same locations that they have denied the promotion of Christianity.  Do we need to continue to pile incident upon incident to create a case?  Or has the time come for action?

Police:  Even after World War II, police were courteous, helpful, protective, polite, and friendly, matching the phrase “to serve and to protect”.  Today, they serve search or arrest warrants, with no less than half a dozen militarily armed SWAT teams; breaking down doors, even if unlocked; shooting dogs and terrorizing the occupants; and, often at the wrong address.  The more they are equipped militarily, purportedly to provide officer protection, the more they are inclined to utilize force, even deadly force, in the conduct of their duties.  Their own personal safety has become paramount, with a total disregard for the safety of the public.  Do we need to continue to pile incident upon incident to create a case?  Or has the time come for action?

Criminal Justice:  “Hate crimes” have become the watchword in criminal justice.  If an act of violence is initiated by a white person (or even Hispanic), then the full force of justice will be imposed upon the perpetrator.  If, however, the act of violence is initiated by a black person on a white person, most often it will be asserted as a robbery, whether property was taken, or not.  Do we need to continue to pile incident upon incident to create a case?  Or has the time come for action?

Constitutional Justice:  Federal judges have, in numerous instances, determined that state constitutional amendments are unconstitutional, even though the amendments were enacted in accordance with state constitutions (Republican form of government) and are consistent with federal law (as in the federal definition of marriage, 1 U.S.C. § 7), or consistent with existing law and common sense (ruling barring Shariah law as a defense in Oklahoma).  These same federal courts have become the source of unlawful legislation to accomplish, by subjective means, social engineering, not authorized by the Constitution.  Do we need to continue to pile incident upon incident to create a case?  Or has the time come for action?

Debt:  They have imposed upon, not only us, but also our great grandchildren, a debt beyond comprehension.  The ability to pay down that debt is nonexistent, making it perpetual, though they continue to borrow and increase that debt, making us a destitute nation.  Do we need to continue to pile incident upon incident to create a case?  Or has the time come for action?

Welfare:  They have provided a smooth and easy path to dependency for those unwilling to fend for themselves.  With more people receiving food stamps, than there are working for a living, we can only wonder, should this trend continue, just who is providing for the food stamps.  The dependence upon government is at an historical high, and the continuation of this policy has no end in sight.  Do we need to continue to pile incident upon incident to create a case?  Or has the time come for action?

Immigration:  They have provided an open door, complete with financial incentive, to those who can find a better life, with less effort, by violating existing laws within this country.  This open door policy denigrates the very concept of what it means to be an “American”, which in times past, was the pursuit of those who entered this country abiding by the rules, with the intention of assimilation rather than invasion.  Do we need to continue to pile incident upon incident to create a case?  Or has the time come for action?

Veterans:  Young men are sent, by the government, to impose destruction and death upon perceived enemies of “our freedoms”.  Once returned, those who were willing to risk their lives “in defense of America” find that the same government that sent them on those dastardly deeds has now labeled them as enemies of the state.  Do we need to continue to pile incident upon incident to create a case?  Or has the time come for action?

Are those same veterans now willing to, once again, risk their lives for really protecting our freedom and liberty — from those who have used them and then tossed them aside?  Do they still have the courage and the desire to do what must be done?  Perhaps they need only look around and understand that the people, not the government, need their willingness, once again, to fight, and die, if necessary, to preserve those freedoms.

It has always, throughout history, primarily fallen to the young men of our nation, whether they have prior military service, or not, and those who support them, to preserve this “grand experiment” of self-government, the United States of America, or to abandon it to those who have corrupted that which was our birthright, and allow their children, their posterity, to submit to a slavery that they are becoming subject to, at this very moment.

There is no longer any need for “a line in the sand”, as it will surely be moved, once again, after we have allowed the incremental expansion of dictatorial government to remove even more of that which made us great.  It is now upon us — it is time to ACT.

“Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery?  Forbid it, Almighty God!”

Patrick Henry, March 23, 1775

Surrender is not an option, though if we continue to submit to the encroachments that are daily imposed upon us, it will surely be the result of our inaction.

Suggested reading:

Let’s Talk About the Constitution

The Constitution is NOT a Suicide Pact

Introduction to Committees of Safety

The Other (not so) Thin Line

A Simplified Explanation of “The Plan for the Restoration of Constitutional Government”

A Thought on Leadership